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19
April
2013

What’s the Best Yogurt?

Yogurts have long been a favourite snack for many hoping to lose weight. You’ll be surprised to learn that many of these yogurts have similar amounts of calories and sugar to a Cadbury flake. Not such a good snack after all!

Below, I’ve listed yogurts per 100g, as this was the average serving size. A big surprise for most people will be that Glenisk are some of the worst offenders for sugar. These are specifically marketed as “organic” and “low fat”, but are some of the highest in both sugar, calories and have a high amount of ingredients.

Yogurts in my opinion should have 1 ingredient – yogurt and also maybe probiotics but the jury is out on whether probiotics are actually that effective. The more ingredients the more it’s processed, if its highly processed its highly suspect, the horse meat scandal should prove that, as again meat should have 1 ingredient.

Protein per 100g in Yogurt is around 4g average, which isn’t that high compared to chicken for example, at around 25g per 100g and even broccoli has 3g of protein per 100g

When you’re comparing the sugar of any yogurt you buy, bare in mind that a sachet you would know from coffee shops is 3g, so Glenisk’s Greek “Style”, “Low Fat” and “Organic” yogurt has an equivalent 7 of those sachets in its 125g tub. Would you put 7 sugars in your coffee?

Muller Lights Fat free yogurt while being low in calories, sugar and fat, is highly processed and contains aspartame a controversial artificial sweetener.

Onken Natural Yogurt seemed to be the best brand I could find in convenience stores – so easily accessibly to most people. It had 69kcals, was low sugar and fat and had similar levels of protein to any other yogurt. However it seemed to only come in a large tub so would require portion control. Portion control is a big problem for a lot of overweight people so they may be better choosing Old MacDonnells brand instead as it was easily available in 100g pots.

Glenisk, Yoplait and most other big brand yogurts should be viewed in much the same way as any sugary treat, to be enjoyed in moderation. You should always check your labels for sugar, fat, calories and artificial sweeteners like aspartame. A truly healthy yogurt will be low in all of these.  Don’t forget to follow me on Facebook to get more articles like this.

Cadburys Flake per bar

Sugar=17.7g
Calories=170kcals
Protein=2.3g
Fat=9.9g.

Glenisk Organic Low Fat Honey Yogurt with Granola (Combined)

Sugar=20.5g
Calories=150kcals
Protein=4.5g
Fat=2g
It has 15+ ingredients.

Glenisk Low Fat Greek “Style” Yogurt

Sugar=17.4g
Calories=120kcals
Protein=4.2g
Fat=3g
It has 9+ ingredients

Sojade Soya Organic 0% Lactose Yogurt

Sugar=11g
Calories=78kcals
Protein=3.8g
Fat=2.1g
It has 8+ ingredients and probiotics.

Yoplait Chocolate Yogurt

Sugar=17.7g
Calories=117kcals
Protein=3.4g
Fat=3g
It has 9+ ingredients

Muller Light “fat free” Yogurt

Sugar=7g
Calories=51
Protein=3.9g
Fat=0g
It has 12+ ingredients including aspartame & phenylalanine.

Old MacDonnells Natural Yogurt

Sugar=5.5g
Calories=79kcals
Protein=5.8g
Fat=2.5g
It has 2 ingredients yogurt & probiotics

Onken Natural Yogurt

Sugar=3.6g
Calories=69kcals
Protein=3.8g
Fat=3.7g
It has 1 ingredient – yogurt

Please share if you think your friends should know about this and don’t forget to like my Facebook page if you’re interested in more articles like this. My next one will be on food labeling and what they really say.

author: Andy Kenny

Comment
8
Dee

Andy, it’s nit exactly comparing like with like! How about the Glenisk natural as a realistic comparison.

Gillian Hughes

Hi Andy, i would like to know how you think the FAGE 0% Greek yoghurt compares to the ones you have listed above – http://products.uk.fage.eu/yoghurt/total-0-170g

Stephanie

The Glenisk Greek Style Natural Yogurt is SO surprising! If there is actually no added (refined) sugar to ’em, does that not mean these occurring sugars are natural in the product itself…Just like fruit has sugar? Would love to know as I love my natural yogurt 🙂

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